10/31/99

 Home
 



 I was born in the 80's so as a kid there was no shortage of horror movies at my viewing disposal.
After all, it was the era of the slasher film...and they were being cranked out at a tumultuous rate.
 
 
 
 
 
Most of the time I'd catch them on television and the Cinemax & HBO intro's would usually end up
paving the way for the feature presentation. So often in fact that they seemed to be part of the movie itself.
 
 
 
 
 
  
But my hands down favorite was always a visit to one of the local video stores. This was long before the likes
of Blockbuster and Hollywood Video hit the scene. Each store seemed to have it's own unique appeal to it. As soon as I'd walk through the door I was immediately mesmerized by the promotional standee displays and the colorful posters that lined the walls like an art gallery.
 
Easily my favorite movie poster of all time.
 
 
 
 
Another aspect of movies that had always intrigued me were their locations. Whether it was the remote woods in Friday the 13th, the dark blue Atlantic Ocean of Jaws or the flashing lights and roller coaster screams on the boardwalk in The Lost Boys. I often wondered, were they real places that anyone could voyage to or were they merely erected for the purpose of that particular film? Well...the answer would be both.
 
My very first location visit was to Quick Hill, the area where the majority of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was filmed and it came courtesy of Tim Harden's groundbreaking website http://www.texaschainsawmassacre.net/.
This was before GPS was widely available and even though I'd never been to the Austin area I had very little trouble locating the spot, thanks to the reliable directions provided.
 
I remember it vividly. The year was 2001. It was a sunny day, unusually warm for early January. As I made my way up the fenced off road I surveyed the surroundings and with each step what I was seeing resembled more and more what I had seen on the screen so many times. I must've stayed on that hill for almost two hours exploring and just taking it all in. So worth the near three-hundred mile detour and a day I'll never forget.
 
 
 
This site is for anyone who may wish to have a similar experience or even share theirs.
Happy hunting.